I flew in the B757 from the right seat


One year ago….

Fly 'n Things

… hmm.. i.e. in a Simulator!

Even though the full motion controller was turned off (and I didn’t actually fly :-)), it was still neat to be in the right seat, and watch the aircraft fly an approach into Denver International Airport with precision. An RNP Approach, at that, which I will never be able to fly in the C172 🙂

A Required Navigation Performance (RNP) procedure is an advanced Performance Based Navigation (PBN) procedure that uses Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation with additional on board monitoring and alerting. To fly one of these procedures it is necessary for both the aircraft and aircrew to be certified to fly. RNP approaches enable precise 3-D paths in congested or noise sensitive airspace, and through difficult terrain. In addition, they provide stabilized and fuel efficient approaches, for aircraft and aircrew certified to fly.

H34LZ

The RNP approach to runway 34L into KDEN provides…

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Temporary Restricted Areas


Words on Wednesdays

Have you heard about the new Temporary Restricted Areas (TRA) that the FAA plans to implement?

According to Dan Namowitz of AOPA:

The FAA has published a final rule establishing three temporary restricted areas near Twentynine Palms, California, in support of a large-scale Marine Corps exercise scheduled for Aug. 7 to 26.

Twentynine Palms temporary special-use airspace. Graphic courtesy of U.S. Marine Corps.

AOPA has long objected to the use of temporary restricted areas to support military exercises, and has called for a moratorium on their use, noting that this temporary airspace is uncharted and creates an unacceptable flight hazard to general aviation pilots.

Also, the publications pilots customarily consult for flight-safety information do not describe the rarely used temporary special-use airspace, creating a gap in pilots’ ability to assess a flight’s risk.

“Notably, temporary restricted areas have not been used in 20 years,” said Rune Duke, AOPA director of airspace and air traffic.

The NOTAM issued for the temporary restricted areas will use the key word “tempo” and will not include a description of where a pilot may find the airspace. The temporary airspace will be graphically depicted on the FAA’s special-use airspace website, and in the Notices to Airmen Publication.

Continue to read the full article here.

West Wing Nostalgia


If you never watched it, now’s the time to watch it. And you will know why I am NOSTALGIC.

I never really was into politics, or ever watched political dramas. I did not start watching the West Wing until much later. If you never watched, I suggest season 1 & 2 definitely.

I ultimately ended up watching all the seasons. There is so much history and politics that is so important. You will understand why I stress, that you do so now, during such a crucial time in our countries’ Politics.

To quote Will Rogers:

“An ignorant person is one who doesn’t know what you have just found out.”

12 Things Truly Confident People Do Differently


Words on Wednesday

 

From the Huffington Post, Author: Dr. Travis Bradberry

Confidence takes many forms, from the arrogance of Floyd Mayweather to the quiet self-assurance of Jane Goodall. True confidence—as opposed to the false confidence people project to mask their insecurities—has a look all its own.

When it comes to confidence, one thing is certain: truly confident people always have the upper hand over the doubtful and the skittish because they inspire others and they make things happen.

Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t—you’re right. – Henry Ford

Ford’s notion that your mentality has a powerful effect on your ability to succeed is manifest in the results of a recent study at the University of Melbourne that showed that confident people went on to earn higher wages and get promoted more quickly than anyone else.

Learning to be confident is clearly important, but what is it that truly confident people do that sets them apart from everyone else?

I did some digging to uncover the 12 cardinal habits of truly confident people so that you can incorporate these behaviors into your repertoire.

1. They Get Their Happiness from Within

Happiness is a critical element of confidence, because in order to be confident in what you do, you have to be happy with who you are.

People who brim with confidence derive their sense of pleasure and satisfaction from their own accomplishments, as opposed to what other people think of their accomplishments. They know that no matter what anyone says, you’re never as good or as bad as people say you are.

2. They Don’t Pass Judgment

Confident people don’t pass judgment on others because they know that everyone has something to offer, and they don’t need to take other people down a notch in order to feel good about themselves. Comparing yourself to other people is limiting. Confident people don’t waste time sizing people up and worrying about whether or not they measure up to everyone they meet.

3. They Don’t Say Yes Unless They Really Want To

Research conducted at the University of California in Berkeley shows that the more difficulty that you have saying no, the more likely you are to experience stress, burnout, and even depression. Confident people know that saying no is healthy, and they have the self-esteem to make their nos clear. When it’s time to say no, confident people avoid phrases such as “I don’t think I can” or “I’m not certain.” They say no with confidence because they know that saying no to a new commitment honors their existing commitments and gives them the opportunity to successfully fulfill them.

4. They Listen More than They Speak

People with confidence listen more than they speak because they don’t feel as though they have anything to prove. Confident people know that by actively listening and paying attention to others, they are much more likely to learn and grow. Instead of seeing interactions as opportunities to prove themselves to others, they focus on the interaction itself, because they know that this is a far more enjoyable and productive approach to people.

5. They Speak with Certainty

It’s rare to hear the truly confident utter phrases such as “Um,” “I’m not sure,” and “I think.” Confident people speak assertively because they know that it’s difficult to get people to listen to you if you can’t deliver your ideas with conviction.

Continue to read the full article here.

Yes! Finals are over!


See you in 2018!