Asian American and Pacific Island History – Maggie Gee, Chinese-American Pilot — Transportation History


May 21, 1979 The U.S Air Force (USAF), in a key victory for a group of American women who had flown planes in support of their country during World War II, officially recognized the active military status of the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) during that global conflict and issued honorable discharges to those aviators. […]

via Asian American and Pacific Island History – Maggie Gee, Chinese-American Pilot — Transportation History

The Hidden Meanings Inside Your Flight Number — Scott Beale Aviation


Anyone who has ever taken a flight, international or domestic, knows that the number on your ticket is the key to everything. It tells you where to go, it helps you find your flight on the departures and arrivals board, and it is one of the main ways that you keep track of yourself and […]

via The Hidden Meanings Inside Your Flight Number — Scott Beale Aviation

“To” & “For” Confusion in Aviation Communications — BruceAir, LLC (bruceair.com)


FAA recently released an update to AC 90-66 Non-Towered Airport Flight Operations (more information here at BruceAir). That update specifically address several contentious issues, such as straight-in approaches, “the active,” and the perenially annoying and counterproductive request “any traffic in the area, please advise.” But one section of the updated AC 90-66B also discusses the […]

via “To” & “For” Confusion in Aviation Communications — BruceAir, LLC (bruceair.com)

Today in Asian American Pacific Islander Transportation History – May 11: Hazel Ying Lee — Transportation History


The Los Angeles Times highlighted an important but increasingly overlooked aviation pioneer from the World War II era. Hazel Ying Lee was the first Chinese-American woman to fly in support of U.S. military efforts, and the article in the Los Angeles Times focused on a 1944 letter from her to one of her still-surviving relatives. […]

via Today in Asian American Pacific Islander Transportation History – May 11: Hazel Ying Lee — Transportation History

How to land the largest passenger aircraft in the world! — Captain Dave


https://videopress.com/embed/gSxzIDmP?hd=0&autoPlay=0&permalink=0&loop=0

Well it has been a while since I’ve put a blog post together. Sorry about that. I have been very busy with various projects including the videos which I hope you have seen and enjoyed. I have previously discussed how we get the A380 into the air, now comes the tricky bit….landing it. A typical […]

via How to land the largest passenger aircraft in the world! — Captain Dave

The Age of Reason — NTSB Safety Compass


By Chairman Robert L. Sumwalt Some scholars play a critical role in founding a whole field of study: Sigmund Freud, in psychology. Noam Chomsky, in linguistics. Albert Einstein, in modern physics. In the field of safety, Dr. James Reason has played such a role. In this field, no single name is better known. Dr. Reason […]

via The Age of Reason — NTSB Safety Compass

Blue Origin sends suborbital rocket to new heights — Cosmic Log


Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin space venture notched another record today when it sent its New Shepard suborbital spaceship on its highest-ever round trip to space. It was the eighth uncrewed test flight for the New Shepard program, and the second go-around for this particular spaceship, which is dubbed RSS H.G. Wells in honor […]

via Blue Origin sends suborbital rocket to new heights — Cosmic Log

Has it really been 5 years?


Discovery Final Fly By

How ironic is it that it was Discovery that did the flyby today over Washington DC, amidst the Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, and the Capitol? Atop a Boeing 747, it soared over the Nation’s Capital at 1500 ft waving a final goodbye before gliding to a landing at it’s final resting place: National Air and Space Museum Udvar-Hazy Center in Dulles, VA.

After a sweeping low flyby past the Washington Monument, it looped over the National Mall not once but twice, slow, silent yet graceful. Past the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, the Capitol, The White House, Lincoln Memorial and Jefferson Memorial. After two graceful loops over the mall, she finally bid adieu headed up the Potomac River past the SW Waterfront,  Reagan National Airport and finally Dulles International Airport. Crowds thronged the mall and other lookout areas taking a break from school, work and other activities to catch a glimpse of history, anxious to snap a photo and discuss the times they had watched a shuttle launch out in Titusville.

When NASA announced the end of the Space Shuttle Missions in 2010, it was finally now or never. It was STS 133 launch that I was scheduled to watch. After several failed attempts to procure KSC launch tickets, my friends and I managed to buy the Dolphin Tours Causeway launch package for STS-133 which was scheduled to liftoff on Nov 1st, 2010. As fate willed it, after waiting almost a week in Florida with daily postponements to the next day, STS-133 launch got scrubbed and re-scheduled for Feb 24th, 2011 when Discovery  accomplished it’s final mission before being retired from service.

It was to be never for me since I have never watched a Shuttle launch or landing. So it is especially a bitter sweet moment to finally see Discovery not on a launchpad strapped to solid rocket boosters 10 miles away blasting off gracefully to space on a crimson and pristine predawn Florida sky but 1500 ft above Washington DC, piggybacked on a Boeing 747.

Discovery  and so we finally meet 🙂

See Also:

Atlantis: Final Flight 
SpaceShipOne Government Zero
SpaceShipOne and I
I touched SpaceShipOne
Lost in Space

Tammie Jo Shults lauded after Southwest Airlines 1380 emergency — Aviate Navigate Communicate


Another aviation hero has emerged folks. Her name is Tammie Jo Shults and is being lauded after a Boeing 737 suffered a catastrophic un-contained engine failure as the aircraft headed west over the south side of New York at about 32,200ft doing around 850kph. Her fighter pilot training skills are believed to have helped as she […]

via Tammie Jo Shults lauded after Southwest Airlines 1380 emergency — Aviate Navigate Communicate