Words on Wednesdays: WAVES

Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES) were a unit of the U.S. Naval Reserve. Mildred McAfee served as the first director of the WAVES. The first class consisted of 644 women, and subsequent classes produced a maximum of 1,250 graduates and by fall 1942, the U.S. Navy had produced a record 10,000 women for active service. WAVES were not eligible for combat duty and duties included everything from patching bullet holes in a naval boat to performing engine checks on a seaplane.  (See more here).

An undated photo from the personal collection of Alice Virginia Benzie, a Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service -- WAVES -- sailor stationed at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., in the 1940s, shows WAVES standing in formation outside the hangars. By the time recruiting ended in 1945, the WAVES boasted a force of 86,000 enlisted and more than 8,000 female officers -- around 2.5 percent of the Navy’s total strength at the time. Courtesy photo

Photo Source: https://www.defense.gov/Explore/News/Article/Article/1102371/remembering-navy-waves-during-womens-history-month/

March is Women History Month and Women in Aviation Month.

See Also:

The WAVES of World War II

Words on Wednesday: Imagination

“Never be limited by other people’s limited imaginations…If you adopt their attitudes, then the possibility won’t exist because you’ll have already shut it out … You can hear other people’s wisdom, but you’ve got to re-evaluate the world for yourself.”

                                                                                         — Dr. Mae Jemison

Words on Wednesday: Hope

When day comes we step out of the shade,
aflame and unafraid,
the new dawn blooms as we free it.
For there is always light,
if only we’re brave enough to see it.
If only we’re brave enough to be it.

                                                      -Amanda Gorman
                                                      National Youth Poet Laurette (from The Hill we Climb)

Repost: Bahamas Baby

Accept the Challenges.
So you might feel the Exhilaration of Victory

Sunday dawned,  clear and beautiful.

 

After breakfast, all of us departed to the airport in shared cabs.  The time was here. Over the weeks we had planned and re-planned. And that morning, re-planned again.

bahamas20

In order to fly to the Bahamas there are some key things to plan ahead of time:

  1. A User Fee Decal for the airplane
  2. A Radio license for the airplane
  3. A radio license for each of the pilots who wishes to fly in the Bahamas
  4. An owner authorization letter for rented aircraft
  5. An international VFR or IFR flight plan to the airport of entry (AOE) with customs in the Bahamas
  6. An eAPIS account to submit the manifest prior to entry into the Bahamas
  7. Customs forms per person or family and an Arrival form for each aircraft
  8. A Transient form to fly to multiple airports within the Bahamas
  9. Life vests (and raft if you prefer) for safety.

Continue to read here.

Repost: In Remembrance

Columbia: Aftermath

Once in a while we come across some events that reach deep into our hearts and make us cry out ‘Why?’. The answers are not easy and take time.

One fine Saturday morning, when most of the country was fast asleep, many not even aware that there was a mission in progress, and that, the Columbia Spacecraft was scheduled to return to earth after a successful mission. Columbia was the first ever shuttle to fly in April of 1981. After 27 successful missions, it was destroyed during reentry on Feb 1.

Continue to read here.

Repost: From the Right Seat

It was one of those days when nothing was working in my favor. Have you experienced one of those days when you feel more like a spectator and things appear beyond your control? When you want to protest or butt in and say that is not what I want to do or how I want to do it? Or realize just a tad bit late that was the wrong thing to do? I was determined to not let the day’s somberness pull me down. After all every cloud has a silver lining.

So when Mike offered the greatest show in the world, I jumped at the chance to ride right seat in the Baron down the Hudson river corridor southbound past the Alpine Tower, GW Bridge, Intrepid, The Clock, Circle the Statue of Liberty, VZ bridge, and back home to DC at night. New York city was resplendent as always with lights turned on all over the city. The Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building stood majestic as always lit up to brighten anyone’s day. If seeing New York from 1100ft during the day was awe inspiring, seeing it in all its glory at night left us breathless. It was one of the coldest days of the season, but the air was clear and crisp in the night sky. With very light traffic flying the corridor that time of the night, we flew in complete contentment enjoying the splendor of the New York skyline at night.

Continue to read here.

See Also:

New York, NY
New York Again
New York Skyline
Finals are here…
Montauk Point
Cape May

Repost: Solo Again

A trip down memory lane

It was a cold winter day- sunny, but cold. The preflight briefer warned that it was going to be clear, but cold, with headwinds all the way up the Sacramento Valley. Lower is better he reiterated. Decision time was nearing. Go or no go? It has been so long since I had flown alone, I racked my brain to remember when last I had flown solo. Since getting my instrument rating, I have always had another pilot along, so I could fly an approach and stay instrument current. This flight though had to be done solo.

Continue to read here.

Repost: iPad+Foreflight+Stratus=Awesome!

Okay I agree I am way behind on the bandwagon… But I have not been flying as often as I would like to, the last year or two.

After my visit to California last time (see Hanger Walk Anyone?), I came away excited and enthusiastic to invest in a new iPad and ForeFlight for iPad. But the iPad I had was wifi only and so all I used it for was pre-flight planning for almost a year.

I saw Stratus in action a few months ago on a $500 hamburger run with fellow 99s and friends Pat and Linda. We dodged clouds and traversed the VFR corridor through the DC SFRA. Wow! I thought, I need to get me one of those!

Continue to read here.

Top Five Visited Posts and New Year’s Resolutions

As 2020 comes to a close, it’s that time of the year to reflect on the past year and make plans for the next year.


Flying over Kennedy Space Center

While I did not fly much in 2020, I did reminisce about my past flying in new posts in 2020 that include:

  1. Hawthorne
  2. Intro Flight
  3. Just like that – To Hearst and back
  4. Flying Destinations – Santa Barbara
  5. Flying Destinations – Santa Ynez

An interesting post that appeared in the last Aviatrix Aerogram was:

Manned vs. Unmanned 

The two most popular blog posts that continue to be the most viewed compared to the rest are so far ahead, that this year I decide to only post the top five visited posts. In fact as noted last year, my Niagara Falls post has even exceeded the Bahamas posts by three times. It continues to be the most visited post this year again! Without much ado, here are the five most visited posts:

  1. GA Flying over Niagara Falls
  2. Flying to the Bahamas in a C172
  3. Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month: Sunita Williams, Indian American Astronaut
  4. Point-to-point Navigation
  5. Monday Morning Inspiration: First African American Woman in Space


Photo courtesy Gert.

Here’s hoping for many new adventures in 2021.

As for New Year Resolutions?

2021 brings forth so much uncertainty, that I am resolving to Just Wing It again!

How about you?

Garfield_NYRes

Stay Safe and Have a very Happy New Year and I hope to see you back here next year!

Repost: Up Up Away

Ballooning over Napa

The air over Napa Valley was crisp and clear, amply suitable for a balloon flight over the lush green wineries. A little to the south, at the Napa Airport winds were gusting 20-30 mph and fog laced the valley, lowering visibility and hindering flight. But that was not a factor for us, as we raced north in vans to Yountville  where  Balloons  above the valley has it’s launch site. The passengers were divided into two groups. Falling into the second group, we would participate in chasing the balloon of the first flight.

Reaching the launch site, we found the balloon already unfurled, inflated, and ready for liftoff. The firsIMG_0132t group of passengers boarded and within minutes were off with barely a whisper of sound. The balloon gracefully climbed, meandering at the mercy of the winds. The chase vans in due course trailed in the wake of the balloon keeping it in sight. Before long it was time to descend and land. A spot was found in the Meridian winery parking lot to land the balloon.  As we watched, the balloon descended over the Meridian winery and to keep the balloon away from the planted  area, a rope was used to yank it to safety.

 

Continue to read here.