Temporary Restricted Areas


Words on Wednesdays

Have you heard about the new Temporary Restricted Areas (TRA) that the FAA plans to implement?

According to Dan Namowitz of AOPA:

The FAA has published a final rule establishing three temporary restricted areas near Twentynine Palms, California, in support of a large-scale Marine Corps exercise scheduled for Aug. 7 to 26.

Twentynine Palms temporary special-use airspace. Graphic courtesy of U.S. Marine Corps.

AOPA has long objected to the use of temporary restricted areas to support military exercises, and has called for a moratorium on their use, noting that this temporary airspace is uncharted and creates an unacceptable flight hazard to general aviation pilots.

Also, the publications pilots customarily consult for flight-safety information do not describe the rarely used temporary special-use airspace, creating a gap in pilots’ ability to assess a flight’s risk.

“Notably, temporary restricted areas have not been used in 20 years,” said Rune Duke, AOPA director of airspace and air traffic.

The NOTAM issued for the temporary restricted areas will use the key word “tempo” and will not include a description of where a pilot may find the airspace. The temporary airspace will be graphically depicted on the FAA’s special-use airspace website, and in the Notices to Airmen Publication.

Continue to read the full article here.

12 Things Truly Confident People Do Differently


Words on Wednesday

 

From the Huffington Post, Author: Dr. Travis Bradberry

Confidence takes many forms, from the arrogance of Floyd Mayweather to the quiet self-assurance of Jane Goodall. True confidence—as opposed to the false confidence people project to mask their insecurities—has a look all its own.

When it comes to confidence, one thing is certain: truly confident people always have the upper hand over the doubtful and the skittish because they inspire others and they make things happen.

Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t—you’re right. – Henry Ford

Ford’s notion that your mentality has a powerful effect on your ability to succeed is manifest in the results of a recent study at the University of Melbourne that showed that confident people went on to earn higher wages and get promoted more quickly than anyone else.

Learning to be confident is clearly important, but what is it that truly confident people do that sets them apart from everyone else?

I did some digging to uncover the 12 cardinal habits of truly confident people so that you can incorporate these behaviors into your repertoire.

1. They Get Their Happiness from Within

Happiness is a critical element of confidence, because in order to be confident in what you do, you have to be happy with who you are.

People who brim with confidence derive their sense of pleasure and satisfaction from their own accomplishments, as opposed to what other people think of their accomplishments. They know that no matter what anyone says, you’re never as good or as bad as people say you are.

2. They Don’t Pass Judgment

Confident people don’t pass judgment on others because they know that everyone has something to offer, and they don’t need to take other people down a notch in order to feel good about themselves. Comparing yourself to other people is limiting. Confident people don’t waste time sizing people up and worrying about whether or not they measure up to everyone they meet.

3. They Don’t Say Yes Unless They Really Want To

Research conducted at the University of California in Berkeley shows that the more difficulty that you have saying no, the more likely you are to experience stress, burnout, and even depression. Confident people know that saying no is healthy, and they have the self-esteem to make their nos clear. When it’s time to say no, confident people avoid phrases such as “I don’t think I can” or “I’m not certain.” They say no with confidence because they know that saying no to a new commitment honors their existing commitments and gives them the opportunity to successfully fulfill them.

4. They Listen More than They Speak

People with confidence listen more than they speak because they don’t feel as though they have anything to prove. Confident people know that by actively listening and paying attention to others, they are much more likely to learn and grow. Instead of seeing interactions as opportunities to prove themselves to others, they focus on the interaction itself, because they know that this is a far more enjoyable and productive approach to people.

5. They Speak with Certainty

It’s rare to hear the truly confident utter phrases such as “Um,” “I’m not sure,” and “I think.” Confident people speak assertively because they know that it’s difficult to get people to listen to you if you can’t deliver your ideas with conviction.

Continue to read the full article here.

Instrument Approaches — Flying Summers Brothers


There is the old saw about getting your Private Pilot certificate, that it “is a ticket to learn,” meaning that you’ve just gotten the little slip of paper that lets you learn to be a better pilot. I totally buy that. I didn’t count on forgetting some of the things I learned, though. To get […]

via Instrument Approaches — Flying Summers Brothers

Words on Wednesdays


Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high 
Where knowledge is free
Where the world has not been broken up into fragments

By narrow domestic walls 

Where words come out from the depths of truth 
Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection 
Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way 
Into the dreary desert sand of dead habit 
Where the mind is led forward by thee 
Into ever-widening thought and action
Into that heaven of freedom, my Father, let my country awake

— taken from the Gitanjali by Rabindranath Tagore

$500 Vegeburger: Cape May


 After a fun evening and morning spent with family and friends, my copilot and I reconvened a little before noon at Republic Airport for the return trip back to the Mid Atlantic. Aircraft fueled and preflighted, we set off north this time. The plan was to circumvent the busy NY airspace around JFK and LGA airports from the northeast and fly down the Hudson River from the north heading south before flying back home.

The airwaves were quieter on Easter Sunday and the air smooth as we made our way south. There was not a cloud in sight but sadly haze still clung around the area preventing crisp, crystal clear photographs and videos. We flew southbound reporting all the check points along the way: Alpine Tower, GWB, Intrepid, Clock and Statue of Liberty. We descended lower to 800 ft as we practiced our turns about the point over the Statue of Liberty.

Tracing the eastern New Jersey shore past Long Beach Island, Atlantic City, Ocean City and Sea Isle City we landed at Cape May, the southern tip of New Jersey a little after 2:00 pm. Cape May Airport (KWWD) is a general aviation airport with 2 major runways.

Once a Naval Air Station, it is currently a civilian airport and houses the Aviation Museum in Hanger 1. The Flight Deck Diner is located in the main terminal building and open daily from 6:00 am to 2:00 pm. Unfortunately, we had forgotten to check the operating hours of the restaurant, after feeding the aircraft at the self serve fuel station, my copilot and I headed home, sans any veg(ham) burger. If you did get one at Cape May, drop me a line 🙂

Flying in the 2000s


“The year 2000 marked not just a new decade but also a new century. The previous century saw the birth of powered, heavier-than-air flight and the amazing development of this world-changing technology. The 20th Century also saw the horrors of two world wars, the Great Depression, the tension of a cold war, the Civil Rights movement, the space race, the spread of democracy, the rise of the internet, and significant advancement for women.

It is unlikely the first decade of the 21st Century will be considered any type of Golden Age. September 11th, 2001 — more simply known as “9/11″ — was a day of tragedy, keenly felt by all of us for whom flying is an integral part of our lives”

Quoted from the April 2017 Aviatrix Aerogram

 

Flying was lighthearted, fun and innocent until 9/11. That changed everything. Not immediately, but in the months and years following that tragic event. Living in California the impact was not as strong, but still prevalent.  I am more cautious of what I say and how I behave in the wake of 9/11.

Although I flew three or four times back in 1998, my first official flying lesson was in August 2000 and I got my private pilot certificate in May 2001, and Instrument rating in May 2004. Although I started my first round of Commercial flight training in fall 2006, I am yet to complete it.

I had a terrific support group with members from my local 99s chapter (SLO99s). Several of us learnt to fly at the same time. We did cross-country flights together, interacted with controllers and other pilots to organize events: we sponsored discovery flights, mentored high school girls, supported airport day events such as Tower Tours, organized safety seminars, and sponsored scholarships.

Fun Flyouts from the 2000s

  • Flew the legendary Palms to Pines Air race from Santa Monica, California, to Bend, Oregon, and back. What a fantastic trip!
  • Flew into Edwards Air Force Base, organized by the San Fernando Valley 99s.
  • Flew to Lancaster Airport for the Southwest Section (SWS) Meeting, visiting NASA Dryden and Scaled Composites and surreptitiously touching SpaceShipOne before its historic first flight into space and history.
  • Flew to Catalina Island. What fun we had landing at this airport!
  • Flew my first foray into the clouds after getting my instrument rating to Watsonville for lunch with the SLO99s.
  • Flew to Columbia for another memorable SWS meeting, camped under the aircraft, and got a chance to fly a Taylorcraft.
  • Flew to Van Nuys under instrument flight rules and flew my first standard terminal arrival route (STAR) after getting my Instrument rating, making it to another fantastic SWS Meeting. Visited Jet Propulsion Lab.
  • Flew the San Francisco Bay tour several times with friends and family members.
DCF 1.0

Note: A version of this appears in the April 2017 Aviatrix Aerogram

$500 Vegeburger: Republic Airport


 Republic airport is located in Farmingdale, Long Island. Nestled between the bustling Class Bravo Airspace surrounding the New York John F. Kennedy airport to the west and the Class Charlie airspace surrounding Islip, Long Island MacArthur Airport to the west, it is a busy general aviation airport, a stone’s throw away from the Big Apple.

After a leisurely lunch at Montauk Point, my copilot and I walked the short distance back to the airport and departed for the short hop to Republic airport where we planned to overnight. The skies had cleared and the sun was shining brightly as we retraced our path, following the South shore over the rich and ostentatious Hamptons, home of the rich and elite.

The air was smooth along the shore, but as we tuned to Republic airport, we could hear pilot reports (PIREP) of moderate turbulence and chop. The airspace was busy with valiant student pilots conducting landing practice and others arriving and departing the area. Other than some slight excitement during landing, the flight was uneventful.

There are three FBOs on the field and all had good reviews, but based on fuel prices we opted for Talon Air. The airport has a landing fee of $20 and tie down fee is waived if 15 gallons of fuel is purchased. We left the aircraft parked at Talon for the night and head out to hang out with family and friends.

There is no restaurant on the field. But transportation arrangements can be made with the FBO. There is an Air power museum on the field.

Note: Photos and video courtesy Gert

See Also:

$500 Vegeburber: Montauk Point
Long Island South Shore to Montauk Point