Today in Transportation History – 2016: The First Asian Woman to Fly Solo Around the World — Transportation History


Airline transport pilot and certified flight instructor Wang Zheng (also known as Julie Wang) became the first Asian woman to circumnavigate the Earth in an airplane, and the first Chinese woman to fly solo around the world, when she returned to the Texas town of Addison in the Dallas area 33 days after starting her […]

via Today in Transportation History – 2016: The First Asian Woman to Fly Solo Around the World — Transportation History

Words on Wednesdays: Letter of the Century


Amen!

Letter of the week: What is wrong with you, white supremacists?

I am a 67-year-old American white woman. My parents enlisted in World War II to fight fascism. They both served; my mother was a nurse, my father navigated bombers. They lost friends in that bloody war so that all the world could be free of fascism. They did not fight so that some white people could claim supremacy or that Nazis could openly walk the streets of America.

 

White person to white supremacist person: What is wrong with you?

Follow this link to read the complete letter:

http://www.sltrib.com/opinion/letters/2017/08/20/letter-of-the-week-what-is-wrong-with-you-white-supremacistsbr/

Perlan II Sets World Record  — The Chiles Files


This project has been fascinating to watch. While the rest of us spent Labor Day weekend kicking back and grilling brats, these guys were riding the Andes’ mountain wave to 52,000 feet and a new world record. In a glider. Worth noting that the previous record holder is Perlan I, which now resides in Seattle’s superlative Museum of […]

via Perlan II Sets World Record  — The Chiles Files

Temporary Restricted Areas


Words on Wednesdays

Have you heard about the new Temporary Restricted Areas (TRA) that the FAA plans to implement?

According to Dan Namowitz of AOPA:

The FAA has published a final rule establishing three temporary restricted areas near Twentynine Palms, California, in support of a large-scale Marine Corps exercise scheduled for Aug. 7 to 26.

Twentynine Palms temporary special-use airspace. Graphic courtesy of U.S. Marine Corps.

AOPA has long objected to the use of temporary restricted areas to support military exercises, and has called for a moratorium on their use, noting that this temporary airspace is uncharted and creates an unacceptable flight hazard to general aviation pilots.

Also, the publications pilots customarily consult for flight-safety information do not describe the rarely used temporary special-use airspace, creating a gap in pilots’ ability to assess a flight’s risk.

“Notably, temporary restricted areas have not been used in 20 years,” said Rune Duke, AOPA director of airspace and air traffic.

The NOTAM issued for the temporary restricted areas will use the key word “tempo” and will not include a description of where a pilot may find the airspace. The temporary airspace will be graphically depicted on the FAA’s special-use airspace website, and in the Notices to Airmen Publication.

Continue to read the full article here.

Save Tangier


Okay, by now I have been to Tangier multiple times.

I even got the coveted VA Ambassador Stamp last October. As it happens although our original plan was to fly to Ocracoke Island and First Flight airport, we had to change our plans due to my school schedule.

Instead, we ended up flying to Tangier again on an  impromptu flight with the flight out group (FOG)  on Sunday. Five aircraft with 14 people ended up at Tangier for lunch at Lorraine’s this holiday weekend. There was much camaraderie, hanger flying, and excellent flying, since the weather was perfect, and  the airspace clear.

Tangier on the other hand is still doing none the better since obviously, whatever anyone says and does, it will disappear one day.  We might be okay callingit fake news, ignore climate change and science, and live in a world of alternate facts.

But nature in the end always wins.

Just this past week, Shelly Island appeared.

This is what we saw when we were in Tangier back in October 2016.

Ultimately, we all pay for our mistakes.

Hopefully, we realize our mistakes, and do something about it, before it is too late!

Links:

The Twilight of Tangier
Belief’s won’t save Tangier
Trump tells Tangier Mayor not to worry about sea-level rise
Save Tangier Island
Trump’s call fuels fund raiser

Note: All photos courtesy of Gert.

Instrument Approaches — Flying Summers Brothers


There is the old saw about getting your Private Pilot certificate, that it “is a ticket to learn,” meaning that you’ve just gotten the little slip of paper that lets you learn to be a better pilot. I totally buy that. I didn’t count on forgetting some of the things I learned, though. To get […]

via Instrument Approaches — Flying Summers Brothers

Words on Wednesdays


Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high 
Where knowledge is free
Where the world has not been broken up into fragments

By narrow domestic walls 

Where words come out from the depths of truth 
Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection 
Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way 
Into the dreary desert sand of dead habit 
Where the mind is led forward by thee 
Into ever-widening thought and action
Into that heaven of freedom, my Father, let my country awake

— taken from the Gitanjali by Rabindranath Tagore

$500 Vegeburger: Cape May


 After a fun evening and morning spent with family and friends, my copilot and I reconvened a little before noon at Republic Airport for the return trip back to the Mid Atlantic. Aircraft fueled and preflighted, we set off north this time. The plan was to circumvent the busy NY airspace around JFK and LGA airports from the northeast and fly down the Hudson River from the north heading south before flying back home.

The airwaves were quieter on Easter Sunday and the air smooth as we made our way south. There was not a cloud in sight but sadly haze still clung around the area preventing crisp, crystal clear photographs and videos. We flew southbound reporting all the check points along the way: Alpine Tower, GWB, Intrepid, Clock and Statue of Liberty. We descended lower to 800 ft as we practiced our turns about the point over the Statue of Liberty.

Tracing the eastern New Jersey shore past Long Beach Island, Atlantic City, Ocean City and Sea Isle City we landed at Cape May, the southern tip of New Jersey a little after 2:00 pm. Cape May Airport (KWWD) is a general aviation airport with 2 major runways.

Once a Naval Air Station, it is currently a civilian airport and houses the Aviation Museum in Hanger 1. The Flight Deck Diner is located in the main terminal building and open daily from 6:00 am to 2:00 pm. Unfortunately, we had forgotten to check the operating hours of the restaurant, after feeding the aircraft at the self serve fuel station, my copilot and I headed home, sans any veg(ham) burger. If you did get one at Cape May, drop me a line 🙂

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