Monday Morning Inspiration: Come from Away


Wonderful Show!

Based on real events from Sept 11, 2001 when 38 airplanes were diverted to the small town of Gander, Newfoundland in Canada, Come From Away, is a heart warming Broadway Musical, that captures the generosity of the residents of Gander who welcomed 7,000 stranded passengers.

Beverly Bass, one of the pioneering pilots (the first female Captain at American Airlines), was the captain of one of the 38 airplanes that landed there that day and whose character is portrayed in the musical.

See Also:

Beverly Bass
Fort Worth native Beverly Bass made Aviation History

Flying Low


Happy Wednesday

Driving can be quite tedious, especially when you’ll Rather be Flying…

To relieve the tedium of long distance driving, I always enjoy watching the rear bumpers of cars. Once, when I was considering buying  a car, a friend had suggested that he always liked to look at the rear profile of a car to see if he liked it. Makes sense, when you think about it: we tend to see the rear end’s of cars more often than their front ends.

In my case though: in addition to trying to see the model and make of a car and whether I like the rear end of it, I am also fascinated with the license plate and any decal the car happens to be adorned with.

That said, pilots can be identified almost immediately. They are happy to proclaim they’ll rather be flying or that their car stops at all airports or carry a license plate that proclaims SWPILOT, LV2FLY, LK2FLY, GOFLY and so on.

Reading car decals and other interesting paraphernalia can reduce the tedium of long distance driving. Sometimes can even lead to interesting conversations at traffic signals, when strangers roll down windows and make conversation as they easily identify you as a pilot, which has happened to me more than once.

Occasionally, this can also lead to scary situations and that too has happened to me. Without meaning to, one time I overtook and cut in in front of a car on the 101 freeway, back in California. I had not even given it a second thought when all of sudden, I was boxed in between two cars, and felt threatened enough to feel some alarm. That was the first time, I worried that my car was easily identifiable with all the  flying paraphernalia that I chose to freely adorn the rear of my car with. If you have watched the movie Duel, you will understand my concern.

I have a friend back in California who had a slogan on her right rear bumper: Flying low. I on the other hand proudly proclaim the Women in Aviation slogan: Women Fly and aviation themed license plate, it is hard to miss my car.

Despite all this, I love that I can indulge in this love of aviation and flying, and make an idle conversation on the roadside with a total stranger who happens to be a pilot!

Note: Re-posted from 2013

Perlan II Sets World Record  — The Chiles Files


This project has been fascinating to watch. While the rest of us spent Labor Day weekend kicking back and grilling brats, these guys were riding the Andes’ mountain wave to 52,000 feet and a new world record. In a glider. Worth noting that the previous record holder is Perlan I, which now resides in Seattle’s superlative Museum of […]

via Perlan II Sets World Record  — The Chiles Files

Temporary Restricted Areas


Words on Wednesdays

Have you heard about the new Temporary Restricted Areas (TRA) that the FAA plans to implement?

According to Dan Namowitz of AOPA:

The FAA has published a final rule establishing three temporary restricted areas near Twentynine Palms, California, in support of a large-scale Marine Corps exercise scheduled for Aug. 7 to 26.

Twentynine Palms temporary special-use airspace. Graphic courtesy of U.S. Marine Corps.

AOPA has long objected to the use of temporary restricted areas to support military exercises, and has called for a moratorium on their use, noting that this temporary airspace is uncharted and creates an unacceptable flight hazard to general aviation pilots.

Also, the publications pilots customarily consult for flight-safety information do not describe the rarely used temporary special-use airspace, creating a gap in pilots’ ability to assess a flight’s risk.

“Notably, temporary restricted areas have not been used in 20 years,” said Rune Duke, AOPA director of airspace and air traffic.

The NOTAM issued for the temporary restricted areas will use the key word “tempo” and will not include a description of where a pilot may find the airspace. The temporary airspace will be graphically depicted on the FAA’s special-use airspace website, and in the Notices to Airmen Publication.

Continue to read the full article here.

Yes! Finals are over!


See you in 2018!