Monday Musings: When in Doubt


This is the best I can offer

In the name of the best within you, do not sacrifice this world to those who are its worst.
In the name of the values that keep you alive, do not let your vision of people be distorted by the ugly, the cowardly, the mindless in those who have never achieved his title.
Do not lose your knowledge that our proper estate is an upright posture,
an intransigent mind and a step that travels unlimited roads.
Do not let your fire go out, spark by irreplaceable spark, in the hopeless swamps of the approximate, the not-quite, the not-yet, the not-at-all.
Do not let the hero in your soul perish, in lonely frustration for the life you deserved, but have never been able to reach.
Check your road and the nature of your battle.
The world you desired can be won, it exists, it is real, it’s yours.
–from the Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand

Fresh on Fridays: Countdown to OSH#1


Asian American and Pacific Island History – Maggie Gee, Chinese-American Pilot — Transportation History


May 21, 1979 The U.S Air Force (USAF), in a key victory for a group of American women who had flown planes in support of their country during World War II, officially recognized the active military status of the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) during that global conflict and issued honorable discharges to those aviators. […]

via Asian American and Pacific Island History – Maggie Gee, Chinese-American Pilot — Transportation History

Today in Transportation History – 1912: The First Woman to Fly Across the English Channel — Transportation History


Aviation pioneer Harriet Quimby became the first woman to fly across the English Channel. The Michigan-born pilot departed Dover, England, for Calais, France, in a monoplane that she had never flown before and with a compass she had just recently learned to use. Quimby, despite those challenges as well as thick fog that limited visibility […]

via Today in Transportation History – 1912: The First Woman to Fly Across the English Channel — Transportation History

First female combat pilot and mother of the air ambulance: The remarkable story of Marie Marvingt — Hush-Kit


Amelia Earhart was all very well, but did she cycle the Tour de France? Amy Johnson was pretty good but did she swim the length of the Seine? Jackie Cochran achieved a lot but was she the champion precision shooter of all France? No. And how many people fly in a supersonic Voodoo jet on their 80th birthday? The remarkable…

via First female combat pilot and mother of the air ambulance: The remarkable story of Marie Marvingt — Hush-Kit

Monday Morning Inspiration: Suzanne Asbury-Oliver


Love in the Clouds

Photo Courtesy: Smithsonian

Suzanne Asbury-Oliver is the only professional female skywriter in the world. She started flying gliders when she was only 14,  soloing at 15 and by the time she was 18, she was a Certified Flight Instructor.

She has been skywriting the skies of United States and Canada for Pepsi Cola Company since 1980. In fact, she met her husband Steve Oliver at the Kentucky Derby while she was skywriting for Pepsi and he was banner towing advertisements in his 1941 Stearman. She and her husband own their own plane and skywriting business called Olivers Flying Circus.

March is Women History Month and Women of Aviation Month.

See Also:

Smithsonian Women in Aviation & Space
Olivers Flying Circus

 

Monday Morning Inspiration #56: Atlantis


When she opened her eyes, she saw sunlight, green leaves, and a man’s face.

She thought: I know what this is.

This was the world she had expected to see it at sixteen.– and now she had reached it– and it seemed so simple, so unastonishing, that the thing she felt was like a blessing pronounced upon the universe by means of three words:

But of course.

She was looking up at the face of a man who knelt by her side, and she knew that in all the years behind her, this was what she would have given her life to see: a face that bore no mark of pain or fear or guilt.

— Atlas Shrugged (Ayn Rand)

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Aida de Acosta — Transportation History


Aviation trailblazer Aida de Acosta (1881-1962) was born in Long Beach, New Jersey. She was the daughter of Ricardo de Acosta, a steamship company executive of Cuban descent. In June 1903 Acosta became the first woman to fly a motorized aircraft on her own. While she was visiting Paris, renowned Brazilian aviator Alberto Santos-Dumont taught […]

via National Hispanic Heritage Month: Aida de Acosta — Transportation History