Eagle & dove — airscape Magazine


Marie Marvingt In March 1915, an injured pilot of the French Aéronautique Militaire was transported to a field hospital behind Verdun, 200km east of Paris. There, one of his nurses learned he had been the only pilot available to fly an important bombing mission. Within days, that nurse would become history’s first female combat pilot. […]

Eagle & dove — airscape Magazine

National Native American Heritage Month: Ola Mildred Rexroat, Pilot


Ola Mildred Rexroat, who achieved fame as the only Native American to serve as one of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) during World War II, …

National Native American Heritage Month: Ola Mildred Rexroat, Pilot

Words on Wednesdays: Ruth Law Oliver


Fearless FlyerRuth Law

Photo source: Smithsonian Air and Space Museum

Pioneering aviator, Ruth Law Oliver,  was born on May 21, 1887.  She was inspired to take up flying by her brother who was parachutist and pioneer movie stuntman Rodman Law. In 1912, Law asked Orville Wright for lessons but he refused, because he thought women weren’t mechanically inclined. She enrolled in the Burgess Flying School and made her first flight on July 5, 1912 and soloed on August 12 of the same year.

She bought her first aircraft from Orville Wright in 1912 in which she became the first woman to fly at night. She set three records in 1916 on a flight from Chicago to New York. She had broken the American cross-country and nonstop record and the world’s record for continuous flight for women pilots. Her total flight time for the 884 miles from Chicago to New York was 8 hours 55 minutes and 35 seconds.

She had the honor of carrying the first official air mail to the Philippine Islands in 1919. After the war, she formed Ruth Law’s Flying Circus, a three-plane troupe that amazed spectators at state and county fairs by racing against cars, flying through fireworks, and setting altitude and distance records. She stopped flying in 1922 to appease her husband. She died on December 1, 1970,  in San Francisco.

March is Women History Month and Women of Aviation Month.

See Also:

Ruth Law—Queen of the Air: Challenging Stereotypes and Inspiring a Nation
Women in Aviation and Space History
This Ace Aviatrix Learned to Fly Even Though Orville Wright Refused to Teach Her

Monday Morning Inspiration: First African American Woman in Space


“Never be limited by other people’s limited imaginations…If you adopt their attitudes, then the possibility won’t exist because you’ll have already shut it out … You can hear other people’s wisdom, but you’ve got to re-evaluate the world for yourself.”

                                                                                                         — Dr Mae Jemison

Dr. Mae Jemison  is an American Astronaut & Physician. She was born on October 17, 1956 in Decatur, AL. She obtained her BS  degree in Chemical Engineering from Stanford in 1977 and an M.D. from Cornell University in 1981. She served in the Peace Corps for 2 1/2 years and became the first African American selected to the NASA Astronaut Program in 1987.

She also became the first African American Women in Space when she orbited the Earth for  190 hrs, 30 minutes, and 23 seconds, with six other astronauts on STS-47 mission on September 12 1992.

After leaving NASA in 1993, she taught at Dartmouth College,  and  currently runs BioSentient Corp, a medical technology company. She continues to be a strong advocate for science eduction

March is Women History Month and Women of Aviation Month.

See Also:
Biography.com
NASA Astronaut Bio
Air and Space

Today in Women’s Transportation History – 2010: The Flying Flapper of Freeport Takes Her Last Flight — Transportation History


Trailblazing aviator Elinor Smith died in Palo Alto, California, at the age of 98. She was born Elinor Regina Patricia Ward in 1911 in New York City. (She became Elinor Smith after her father, whose wide-ranging show business pursuits included singing and comedy, changed his name to Tom Smith.) Elinor Smith grew up in the […]

via Today in Women’s Transportation History – 2010: The Flying Flapper of Freeport Takes Her Last Flight — Transportation History

Monday Morning Inspiration: First American Woman in Space


Sally Ride

Sally Ride's official astronaut portrait

Photo Courtesy: NASA

Sally Ride was born on May 26th, 1951 in Encino, CA. Older of two daughters, her interest in science grew at an early age. She went on to get a bachelor of science in Physics, a bachelor of arts in English, a master of science and a PhD in physics from Stanford University.

When NASA was looking for woman astronaut candidates in 1977, Sally Ride was one of the six women selected. She became the first American woman in space when she flew aboard Space Shuttle Challenger on June 18th, 1983.

She made two shuttle flights, and later became a champion for science education and a role model for generations. She wrote five science related children’s books and co-founded, Sally Ride Science, to encourage children, especially girls, to study science.

She died of cancer in 2012.

March is Women History Month & Women of Aviation Month.

See Also:

NASA Bio
Sally Ride: First American Woman in Space

Happy International Women’s Day


Avani Chaturvedi

Source: Indianwomenblog.org

There was a news item earlier this week that Indian Women Pilots have surpassed the global average. I had written a brief article last year about how, even though there is no General Aviation activity, the proportion of women pilots in India was higher than other countries.

This past week, Avani Chaturvedi became the first Indian Women to fly a fighter jet solo, a MIG -21 Bison for 30 minutes. What is remarkable is, she is 24 years old and is one of the three women inducted into the Indian Air Force. The other two women are Bavana Kanth and Mohana Singh.

See Also:

Indian Women Pilots
First Indian Women to Fly a Fighter Jet
Indian Women Soar past the Global Average

 

Today in Women’s Transportation History – 1931: An Aviation Legend is Born — Transportation History


Geraldyn “Jerrie” M. Cobb, a well-established female trailblazer of the skies, was born in Norman, Oklahoma. Her father was a pilot and, with his encouragement, she developed a strong interest in aviation at an early age. By the time she was 12, Cobb was learning how to fly in her father’s 1936 Waco Aircraft Company […]

via Today in Women’s Transportation History – 1931: An Aviation Legend is Born — Transportation History

Monday Morning Inspiration: Blanche Stuart Scott


First Women to Fly

Blanche Scott was the first women to drive across the United States and the first women to fly.

Born in 1889, Blanche Scott’s life spanned from the era of airplane invention, to seeing the first man walk on the moon. In an age when women couldn’t vote and their place was considered to be at home, she became the first woman to drive across the US. There were only 218 miles of roads outside the cities.

Photo courtesy Wikepedia: Blanche Stuart Scott seated at the controls of a Curtiss Model D, circa early 1910s.

Some aviation firsts:

  • She became the first women to take a shot solo hop in the air, when an aircraft she was taxing lifted off the ground.
  • She was the first and only women to receive flight instruction from Glenn Curtiss.
  • She made her first public flight  in October 1910.
  • She set the women’s long distance record for flight of 10 miles and later 25 miles in 1911
  • She became the first women test pilot in America,  the first woman stunt pilot or The Tomboy of the Air
  • She played the lead role in The Aviator’s Bride, the first movie about flying
  • She was also the first women passenger to ride in a passenger jet

March is Women History Month, and Women of Aviation Month.

See Also:

National Women’s Hall of Fame
Smithsonian – Women in Aviation and Space History
Early Aviators

Today in Transportation History – 2016: The First Asian Woman to Fly Solo Around the World — Transportation History


Airline transport pilot and certified flight instructor Wang Zheng (also known as Julie Wang) became the first Asian woman to circumnavigate the Earth in an airplane, and the first Chinese woman to fly solo around the world, when she returned to the Texas town of Addison in the Dallas area 33 days after starting her […]

via Today in Transportation History – 2016: The First Asian Woman to Fly Solo Around the World — Transportation History