Today in Transportation History – 2016: The First Asian Woman to Fly Solo Around the World — Transportation History


Airline transport pilot and certified flight instructor Wang Zheng (also known as Julie Wang) became the first Asian woman to circumnavigate the Earth in an airplane, and the first Chinese woman to fly solo around the world, when she returned to the Texas town of Addison in the Dallas area 33 days after starting her […]

via Today in Transportation History – 2016: The First Asian Woman to Fly Solo Around the World — Transportation History

Flying Low


Happy Wednesday

Driving can be quite tedious, especially when you’ll Rather be Flying…

To relieve the tedium of long distance driving, I always enjoy watching the rear bumpers of cars. Once, when I was considering buying  a car, a friend had suggested that he always liked to look at the rear profile of a car to see if he liked it. Makes sense, when you think about it: we tend to see the rear end’s of cars more often than their front ends.

In my case though: in addition to trying to see the model and make of a car and whether I like the rear end of it, I am also fascinated with the license plate and any decal the car happens to be adorned with.

That said, pilots can be identified almost immediately. They are happy to proclaim they’ll rather be flying or that their car stops at all airports or carry a license plate that proclaims SWPILOT, LV2FLY, LK2FLY, GOFLY and so on.

Reading car decals and other interesting paraphernalia can reduce the tedium of long distance driving. Sometimes can even lead to interesting conversations at traffic signals, when strangers roll down windows and make conversation as they easily identify you as a pilot, which has happened to me more than once.

Occasionally, this can also lead to scary situations and that too has happened to me. Without meaning to, one time I overtook and cut in in front of a car on the 101 freeway, back in California. I had not even given it a second thought when all of sudden, I was boxed in between two cars, and felt threatened enough to feel some alarm. That was the first time, I worried that my car was easily identifiable with all the  flying paraphernalia that I chose to freely adorn the rear of my car with. If you have watched the movie Duel, you will understand my concern.

I have a friend back in California who had a slogan on her right rear bumper: Flying low. I on the other hand proudly proclaim the Women in Aviation slogan: Women Fly and aviation themed license plate, it is hard to miss my car.

Despite all this, I love that I can indulge in this love of aviation and flying, and make an idle conversation on the roadside with a total stranger who happens to be a pilot!

Note: Re-posted from 2013

Words on Wednesdays: Letter of the Century


Amen!

Letter of the week: What is wrong with you, white supremacists?

I am a 67-year-old American white woman. My parents enlisted in World War II to fight fascism. They both served; my mother was a nurse, my father navigated bombers. They lost friends in that bloody war so that all the world could be free of fascism. They did not fight so that some white people could claim supremacy or that Nazis could openly walk the streets of America.

 

White person to white supremacist person: What is wrong with you?

Follow this link to read the complete letter:

http://www.sltrib.com/opinion/letters/2017/08/20/letter-of-the-week-what-is-wrong-with-you-white-supremacistsbr/

Perlan II Sets World Record  — The Chiles Files


This project has been fascinating to watch. While the rest of us spent Labor Day weekend kicking back and grilling brats, these guys were riding the Andes’ mountain wave to 52,000 feet and a new world record. In a glider. Worth noting that the previous record holder is Perlan I, which now resides in Seattle’s superlative Museum of […]

via Perlan II Sets World Record  — The Chiles Files

Temporary Restricted Areas


Words on Wednesdays

Have you heard about the new Temporary Restricted Areas (TRA) that the FAA plans to implement?

According to Dan Namowitz of AOPA:

The FAA has published a final rule establishing three temporary restricted areas near Twentynine Palms, California, in support of a large-scale Marine Corps exercise scheduled for Aug. 7 to 26.

Twentynine Palms temporary special-use airspace. Graphic courtesy of U.S. Marine Corps.

AOPA has long objected to the use of temporary restricted areas to support military exercises, and has called for a moratorium on their use, noting that this temporary airspace is uncharted and creates an unacceptable flight hazard to general aviation pilots.

Also, the publications pilots customarily consult for flight-safety information do not describe the rarely used temporary special-use airspace, creating a gap in pilots’ ability to assess a flight’s risk.

“Notably, temporary restricted areas have not been used in 20 years,” said Rune Duke, AOPA director of airspace and air traffic.

The NOTAM issued for the temporary restricted areas will use the key word “tempo” and will not include a description of where a pilot may find the airspace. The temporary airspace will be graphically depicted on the FAA’s special-use airspace website, and in the Notices to Airmen Publication.

Continue to read the full article here.

12 Things Truly Confident People Do Differently


Words on Wednesday

 

From the Huffington Post, Author: Dr. Travis Bradberry

Confidence takes many forms, from the arrogance of Floyd Mayweather to the quiet self-assurance of Jane Goodall. True confidence—as opposed to the false confidence people project to mask their insecurities—has a look all its own.

When it comes to confidence, one thing is certain: truly confident people always have the upper hand over the doubtful and the skittish because they inspire others and they make things happen.

Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t—you’re right. – Henry Ford

Ford’s notion that your mentality has a powerful effect on your ability to succeed is manifest in the results of a recent study at the University of Melbourne that showed that confident people went on to earn higher wages and get promoted more quickly than anyone else.

Learning to be confident is clearly important, but what is it that truly confident people do that sets them apart from everyone else?

I did some digging to uncover the 12 cardinal habits of truly confident people so that you can incorporate these behaviors into your repertoire.

1. They Get Their Happiness from Within

Happiness is a critical element of confidence, because in order to be confident in what you do, you have to be happy with who you are.

People who brim with confidence derive their sense of pleasure and satisfaction from their own accomplishments, as opposed to what other people think of their accomplishments. They know that no matter what anyone says, you’re never as good or as bad as people say you are.

2. They Don’t Pass Judgment

Confident people don’t pass judgment on others because they know that everyone has something to offer, and they don’t need to take other people down a notch in order to feel good about themselves. Comparing yourself to other people is limiting. Confident people don’t waste time sizing people up and worrying about whether or not they measure up to everyone they meet.

3. They Don’t Say Yes Unless They Really Want To

Research conducted at the University of California in Berkeley shows that the more difficulty that you have saying no, the more likely you are to experience stress, burnout, and even depression. Confident people know that saying no is healthy, and they have the self-esteem to make their nos clear. When it’s time to say no, confident people avoid phrases such as “I don’t think I can” or “I’m not certain.” They say no with confidence because they know that saying no to a new commitment honors their existing commitments and gives them the opportunity to successfully fulfill them.

4. They Listen More than They Speak

People with confidence listen more than they speak because they don’t feel as though they have anything to prove. Confident people know that by actively listening and paying attention to others, they are much more likely to learn and grow. Instead of seeing interactions as opportunities to prove themselves to others, they focus on the interaction itself, because they know that this is a far more enjoyable and productive approach to people.

5. They Speak with Certainty

It’s rare to hear the truly confident utter phrases such as “Um,” “I’m not sure,” and “I think.” Confident people speak assertively because they know that it’s difficult to get people to listen to you if you can’t deliver your ideas with conviction.

Continue to read the full article here.

Save Tangier


Okay, by now I have been to Tangier multiple times.

I even got the coveted VA Ambassador Stamp last October. As it happens although our original plan was to fly to Ocracoke Island and First Flight airport, we had to change our plans due to my school schedule.

Instead, we ended up flying to Tangier again on an  impromptu flight with the flight out group (FOG)  on Sunday. Five aircraft with 14 people ended up at Tangier for lunch at Lorraine’s this holiday weekend. There was much camaraderie, hanger flying, and excellent flying, since the weather was perfect, and  the airspace clear.

Tangier on the other hand is still doing none the better since obviously, whatever anyone says and does, it will disappear one day.  We might be okay callingit fake news, ignore climate change and science, and live in a world of alternate facts.

But nature in the end always wins.

Just this past week, Shelly Island appeared.

This is what we saw when we were in Tangier back in October 2016.

Ultimately, we all pay for our mistakes.

Hopefully, we realize our mistakes, and do something about it, before it is too late!

Links:

The Twilight of Tangier
Belief’s won’t save Tangier
Trump tells Tangier Mayor not to worry about sea-level rise
Save Tangier Island
Trump’s call fuels fund raiser

Note: All photos courtesy of Gert.

Instrument Approaches — Flying Summers Brothers


There is the old saw about getting your Private Pilot certificate, that it “is a ticket to learn,” meaning that you’ve just gotten the little slip of paper that lets you learn to be a better pilot. I totally buy that. I didn’t count on forgetting some of the things I learned, though. To get […]

via Instrument Approaches — Flying Summers Brothers

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