Gov. Shutdown Effects on Aviation — Aviation Ideas and Discussion!


This political showdown has given both “sides” a megaphone to voice political viewpoints. Avoiding all this hostility (please?), the effect on aviation – and especially flight training- is increasingly damaging as this shutdown continues to deepen. (We had two charter jets grounded waiting for RVSM approval – FSDOs closed – but fortunately the reg. now…

via Gov. Shutdown Effects on Aviation — Aviation Ideas and Discussion!

Seasonal Safety: SANTA! — Aviation Ideas and Discussion!


In keeping with the holiday spirit, I thought I’d use this specially created instrument approach procedure (IAP) chart that Jeppesen put out a couple years ago for the North Pole for this blog article. Although the chart is clearly a figment of someone’s imagination, it still can be used as a teaching aid in explaining…

via Seasonal Safety: SANTA! — Aviation Ideas and Discussion!

Airplane Cookies have Arrived & Departed! — Fly ‘n Cook


It has been a while since I posted here. Not that I haven’t been cooking new recipes, but just no time to take pictures and post. I hope to start doing this more often as I ramp up my effort to clean eating and fitness in the new year! As has been the tradition the […]

via Airplane Cookies have Arrived & Departed! — Fly ‘n Cook

An Out-Of-This-World Adventure Begins — Transportation History


December 21, 1968 Apollo 8, the second human spaceflight mission of the Apollo program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), was launched from the John F. Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 7:51 a.m. Eastern Standard Time. The members of this mission’s crew were U.S. Air Force (USAF) Colonel Frank Borman, U.S. Navy […]

via An Out-Of-This-World Adventure Begins — Transportation History

The Day History Took Flight — Transportation History


December 17, 1903 It was the dawn of a new era. Orville and Wilbur Wright made transportation history near the North Carolina town of Kill Devil Hills (about four miles, or6.4 kilometers, south of the better-known town of Kitty Hawk) by bringing about the world’s first controlled, powered, and sustained heavier-than-air human flight. The brothers each […]

via The Day History Took Flight — Transportation History

He Didn’t Know How to Fly, But That Didn’t Stop Him — Transportation History


November 29, 1882 Aviation pioneer Henri Fabre was born in the French city of Marseille. Fabre’s advanced knowledge of science early on in life helped foster his powerful interest in human flight. With unmatched intensity, he studied and developed designs for planes and propellers. The result of Fabre’s efforts was his creation of the first […]

via He Didn’t Know How to Fly, But That Didn’t Stop Him — Transportation History

National Native American Heritage Month – Eula “Pearl” Carter Scott, Pilot — Transportation History


Eula “Pearl” Carter Scott made aviation history in1929 when she took off in a plane for a solo flight. Pearl, who was only 13 at the time, became the youngest pilot in the United States. She had been born in the city of Marlow in Oklahoma in 1915. Her mother was an enrolled member of […]

via National Native American Heritage Month – Eula “Pearl” Carter Scott, Pilot — Transportation History

Us and Them — Pondering Poet Pilot


I’m comfortable with you and me – I’m not so sure about them. They’re not from here, their clothes are strange, They’re easy to condemn. They speak some other language too – I don’t know why they’re here! And, what is worse, they’ve brought their kids! Oh God, I need a beer! Let’s […]

via Us and Them — Pondering Poet Pilot

National Native American Heritage Month – Mary Golda Ross, Engineer — Transportation History


Mary Golda Ross was the first known Native American female engineer. She was born in the Oklahoma community of Park Hill in 1908. One of her great-grandfathers was John Ross, a longtime and widely renowned chief of the Cherokee Nation who helped guide his people through such tumultuous experiences as the Civil War and the […]

via National Native American Heritage Month – Mary Golda Ross, Engineer — Transportation History

The 155th Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address — Diary of a Scribbler


 

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 1, 1863 For 3 days (July 1-3, 1863) the 2,400 residents of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, hunkered down in their homes and cellars, waiting for the violent storm to pass. Outside the air was filled with bullets, exploding artillery shells, the pounding of horse hooves, and “rebel shrieks” that “permeated their homes, their cellars, […]

via The 155th Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address — Diary of a Scribbler