Repost: Cape May

 After a fun evening and morning spent with family and friends, my copilot and I reconvened a little before noon at Republic Airport for the return trip back to the Mid Atlantic. Aircraft fueled and preflighted, we set off north this time. The plan was to circumvent the busy NY airspace around JFK and LGA airports from the northeast and fly down the Hudson River from the north heading south before flying back home.

The airwaves were quieter on Easter Sunday and the air smooth as we made our way south. There was not a cloud in sight but sadly haze still clung around the area preventing crisp, crystal clear photographs and videos. We flew southbound reporting all the check points along the way: Alpine Tower, GWB, Intrepid, Clock and Statue of Liberty. We descended lower to 800 ft as we practiced our turns about the point over the Statue of Liberty.

Tracing the eastern New Jersey shore past Long Beach Island, Atlantic City, Ocean City and Sea Isle City we landed at Cape May, the southern tip of New Jersey a little after 2:00 pm. Cape May Airport (KWWD) is a general aviation airport with 2 major runways.

Once a Naval Air Station, it is currently a civilian airport and houses the Aviation Museum in Hanger 1. The Flight Deck Diner is located in the main terminal building and open daily from 6:00 am to 2:00 pm. Unfortunately, we had forgotten to check the operating hours of the restaurant, after feeding the aircraft at the self serve fuel station, my copilot and I headed home, sans any veg(ham) burger. If you did get one at Cape May, drop me a line 🙂

Repost: Lewisburg

After a hiatus of almost 6 months, the dc99s kicked off their flying season with a flight to Lewisburg (LWB) WV. It was one of those days when the forecast weather was glorious at the departure airport: 80s with sunny skies with a chance of rain in the afternoon which is common on most days during summer in the east coast.

Debbie and I set off in her C182 G1000. The decision was last minute. Since her aircraft was off for maintenance. Given the glorious weekend weather we pushed our monthly flyout to Sunday so her aircraft would be back in action and also not to overlap the  International Learn to Fly day.

We departed Frederick Airport (FDK) to clear, blue, warm skies. Before we knew it, 30 miles out we hit dark gloomy skies with rain bearing clouds! Wasn’t this supposed to be one of those glorious summer days? Unsure what lay ahead I prompted Debbie to turn around 180 degrees. Fortunately her C182 G1000 was equipped with Weather, and Traffic information. Looking at the rain cells and considering our options, we plotted a route to circumvent those cells. A little longer route but still do able. So we pressed on. What looked impossible in that instant, watching Debbie navigate and see her comfort zone, I knew she was okay with flying through a little rain and dark gloomy weather. “Look below,” she said,” we are still VFR.

Continue to read here.

Repost: Blue Ridge Airport

We lucked out this past weekend. I had planned a flyout to Blue Ridge Airport and the weather actually was perfect! Unfortunately the holiday weekend meant there were fewer pilots interested in the flight. But Gert and I had the aircraft reserved all day long and there were opportunities to fly, grab a vegeburger, collect stamps and maybe shoot approaches!

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We set off as usual a little later than planned. I don’t remember a time I left ahead of schedule. This time, I had somehow unknowingly filed FLUKY -> HEF as opposed to HEF->FLUKY. And living inside the SFRA meant that ATC  couldn’t let us depart without a valid flight plan in place or refile the flight plan for us. This meant we had to shut off the engine, call in a new flight plan and wait the necessary few minutes for the flight plan to arrive at the tower.

Continue to read here.

Repost: To Castle & Back

Some fun flying 16 years ago…

Fly 'n Things

“Cessna 69N, 20 miles south of Atwater, say intentions?” asked  NORCAL Aproach.
“Request ILS 31 approach into Atwater”  responded I.
“Decend and maintain 5000, fly heading  310”
“Roger” said I and eased back the throttle to  2000rpm to start a slow descent from the 8000ft we were flying on our way to Atwater and turned to a heading of 310. Nothing happened! The VSI still stayed at zero. The tachometer read 2000rpm. What was going on? It din’t look like we were descending even an inch.  I pulled back some more to 1500 rpm. Still nothing happened. I scaned the other instruments to take stock of the situation. It was only a month ago that I had flown. I couldn’t possibly have forgotten how to fly. What was I missing. As I glanced over the airspeed indicator, it read 80 knots. My heart skipped a beat. We were slowing down…

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Repost: Bahamas Baby

Accept the Challenges.
So you might feel the Exhilaration of Victory

Sunday dawned,  clear and beautiful.

 

After breakfast, all of us departed to the airport in shared cabs.  The time was here. Over the weeks we had planned and re-planned. And that morning, re-planned again.

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In order to fly to the Bahamas there are some key things to plan ahead of time:

  1. A User Fee Decal for the airplane
  2. A Radio license for the airplane
  3. A radio license for each of the pilots who wishes to fly in the Bahamas
  4. An owner authorization letter for rented aircraft
  5. An international VFR or IFR flight plan to the airport of entry (AOE) with customs in the Bahamas
  6. An eAPIS account to submit the manifest prior to entry into the Bahamas
  7. Customs forms per person or family and an Arrival form for each aircraft
  8. A Transient form to fly to multiple airports within the Bahamas
  9. Life vests (and raft if you prefer) for safety.

Continue to read here.