Goodbye 2019


End of a decade

2019 marks the end of the first decade in the 21st century.

I only flew once this year. And what a flight that was…

There was tremendous progress on other fronts, and I think next year should bring forth many more flying adventures.

The top five visited posts this past year were:

  1. GA Flying over Niagara Falls
  2. Flying to the Bahamas in a C172
  3. Point-to-point Navigation
  4. Oshkosh Flyin: Rock your Wings
  5. Indian Women Pilots

Interesting to see that the viewership of  my Niagara Falls article was double the Bahamas article which until last year was the most visited!

Photo courtesy Gert.

Here’s wishing an exciting and adventurous Roaring 20’s!

Happy Anniversary


I received this message yesterday from WordPress:

Happy Anniversary with WordPress.com!
You registered on WordPress.com 9 years ago.
Thanks for flying with us. Keep up the good blogging.
I loved the “flying” touch!
While I couldn’t quite track down my first post on WordPress, here is some information I posted previously.

I moved my blog to WordPress sometime in 2010 with 30 prior posts. This week I reached 1000 posts!

It wasn’t until some time in late 2012, that WordPress started to track visitor statistics. It wasn’t also until 2012-2013 that I increased the frequency of posts. So it is reasonable that as the frequency of posts increased, the number of views increased, steeply initially, more gradually this past year.

The top 5 posts continue to be:

GA Flying over Niagara Falls

Flying to the Bahamas in a C172

Point-to-Point Navigation

Oshkosh Flyin Rock your Wings

Indian Women Pilots

Thanks for visiting … and Happy Blogging!

See Also:

Some Interesting Statistics

Five Years Ago: Grass!


Robinson airport (MD14) is a small private, grass airport along the Patuxent River, but  inside the SFRA. There are two grass runways : R9/R27 and R18/R36. They are difficult to identify if you are not familiar with the airspace. Huge smokestacks to the left of them along the river give an indication of where to look. R9/R27 almost looks like a grass field and not really a runway. If you didn’t know it existed, you likely wouldn’t have thought it was one!

grass2

R9/R27 is the larger runway at 2,600ftx70ft, bumpy and running a little uphill, when landing on R9; while trees line the end of R27, requiring a higher than normal approach, and a more precise landing.

Continue to read here.

Long Before There Were Airspace Restrictions Over Washington, DC This Daredevil Flew Around the City — Transportation History


June 14, 1906 Let’s just say that it wasn’t your typical workday in Washington, D.C. . . . Daredevil aviation pioneer Lincoln Beachey left a lasting impression on many as he steered his airship above and even alongside various landmark buildings in the nation’s capital. The next day’s edition of the Washington Post called this trip through the […]

via Long Before There Were Airspace Restrictions Over Washington, DC This Daredevil Flew Around the City — Transportation History

The Challenge of a Changing “Self” by Lane Wallace


On the wall of my office, I have a framed copy of the cover for Flying magazine’s October 2000 issue. Unlike most of the magazine’s covers, which feature an airplane of some kind, this one featured … me. Granted, there is an airplane, or at least part of one, in the image. But I’m the main attraction. I’m sitting on the wing of a beautiful Staggerwing Beech biplane, in shorts and a blue, sleeveless, button-down shirt, gazing off into the sunset, under the headline “Oshkosh Dreams.”

If that cover doesn’t sound familiar to anyone, it’s because it never ran. The art director always produced two cover layouts, one of which got chosen for the publication run. So I have the only copy of that cover. It’s part of why I like it, and why it’s up on my wall. I’m a cover girl, but only within the confines of my own home.

More to the point, however, that image of my youthful, tanned self was taken more than 18 years ago. I still see myself, when I look at it. But I’m also not that particular woman anymore. So much has happened; so much has changed. That is, incidentally, as it should be. But it also emphasizes a really important point about being ourselves.

Continue to read the full article here.

Us and Them — Pondering Poet Pilot


I’m comfortable with you and me – I’m not so sure about them. They’re not from here, their clothes are strange, They’re easy to condemn. They speak some other language too – I don’t know why they’re here! And, what is worse, they’ve brought their kids! Oh God, I need a beer! Let’s […]

via Us and Them — Pondering Poet Pilot

The 155th Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address — Diary of a Scribbler


 

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 1, 1863 For 3 days (July 1-3, 1863) the 2,400 residents of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, hunkered down in their homes and cellars, waiting for the violent storm to pass. Outside the air was filled with bullets, exploding artillery shells, the pounding of horse hooves, and “rebel shrieks” that “permeated their homes, their cellars, […]

via The 155th Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address — Diary of a Scribbler

Money is the root of all evil


“So you think that money is the root of all evil?” said Francisco d’Anconia. “Have you ever asked what is the root of money? Money is a tool of exchange, which can’t exist unless there are goods produced and men able to produce them. Money is the material shape of the principle that men who wish to deal with one another must deal by trade and give value for value. Money is not the tool of the moochers, who claim your product by tears, or of the looters, who take it from you by force. Money is made possible only by the men who produce. Is this what you consider evil?

“When you accept money in payment for your effort, you do so only on the conviction that you will exchange it for the product of the effort of others. It is not the moochers or the looters who give value to money. Not an ocean of tears nor all the guns in the world can transform those pieces of paper in your wallet into the bread you will need to survive tomorrow. Those pieces of paper, which should have been gold, are a token of honor – your claim upon the energy of the men who produce. Your wallet is your statement of hope that somewhere in the world around you there are men who will not default on that moral principle which is the root of money. Is this what you consider evil?

“Have you ever looked for the root of production? Take a look at an electric generator and dare tell yourself that it was created by the muscular effort of unthinking brutes. Try to grow a seed of wheat without the knowledge left to you by men who had to discover it for the first time. Try to obtain your food by means of nothing but physical motions – and you’ll learn that man’s mind is the root of all the goods produced and of all the wealth that has ever existed on earth.

–Francisco d’Anconia  from the Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand

Continue to read the full speech here.