Taliesin West


Taliesin West is a look over the rim of the world.

                                                                                            – Frank Lloyd Wright, 1943

I know the price of success: dedication, hard work, and an unremitting devotion to the things you want to see happen.

 

In 1937, when Frank Lloyd Wright (FLW) sought a winter home, he chose Scottsdale, AZ. It became the bustling home of the Taliesin fellowship, built solely by his apprentices. Even today, the FLW School of Architecture students maintain this decades old tradition as they pack up and journey to Wisconsin in Spring to their summer home in Taliesin East and retrace their path to Scottesdale, AZ for the winter months.

I think I have talked often about my interest in Architecture over the years on my blog. So it should not come as any surprise to followers of my blog, that as  I started to plan my vacation to Phoenix AZ, that Taliesin West would somehow factor into the planning. Having visited several FLW homes in California, Virginia, Illinois, Wisconsin, including visiting Taliesin East some years back. Visiting Taliesin West has long been overdue.

As I planned my trip, I checked programs and tours on FLW Foundation website. A three hour behind the scenes tour is offered on Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays. There are other details and insights tours offered on other days and times of the week.  There are also night tours for those who prefer that. Feel free to check the FLW Foundation website for more information.

While Falling Water will forever remain my most favorite building, after thinking about it for so long and finally visiting Taliesin West was both inspiring  and invigorating.

Here is some information from the FLW website:

“Taliesin West is a National Historic Landmark nestled in the desert foothills of the McDowell Mountains in Scottsdale, AZ. It is also the home of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and the School of Architecture at Taliesin.

Wright’s beloved winter home and the bustling headquarters of the Taliesin Fellowship, was established in 1937 and diligently handcrafted over many years into a world unto itself. Deeply connected to the desert from which it was forged, Taliesin West possesses an almost prehistoric grandeur. It was built and maintained almost entirely by Wright and his apprentices, making it among the most personal of the architect’s creations.”

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See Also:

SEZ, Who?
Taliesin East
Falling Water
Oak Park
FrankLloydWright.org

 

SEZ Who?


The earth has music for those who listen
— William Shakespeare

Sedona,  a land of timeless beauty, surrounded by magnificent, natural red rock sculptures and pristine National Forest. Standing about 4,300ft above sea level, centrally located less than two hours north of Phoenix and just two hours south of the Grand Canyon, it is one of the most spectacular secrets of the world. Erosion has sculptured this masterpiece for over 350 million years.

As we drove north, I was almost disappointed. All that we saw were pine trees and the landscape looked no different from other countrysides. When we had set off it was hot and 90 degrees.

“Isn’t early morning better for a flight?” I had asked.
“No, anytime is fine,” was the response.

Checking the forecast that morning, I wondered how the day would play out. With thunderstorms in the forecast, chances of pulling off this flight were diminishing. I weighed the odds of planning something else as opposed to keeping the afternoon open and have my flying plans cancelled.

We arrived at Flagstaff (FLG) airport a little early, eager to take to the skies. Fred, the instructor at Wiseman Aviation who was going to fly with us had assured us that thunderstorms in the forecast were not a factor. In no time we preflighted and departed with me at the controls and Fred’s able guidance. He made sure to remind me about the the departure procedures, density altitude and other necessary details. Fred was also our tour guide, as he pointed out landmarks along the way – painted dessert, canyons, native American dwellings, dormant volcanoes, Sun coast crater, ski areas and more.

When I put together my flying bucket list a few years ago, I had added Sedona and Grand Canyon as an after thought. My interest had been sparked by the beautiful aerial images that Greg Brown had posted on his blog and in articles he has written over the years. Despite seeing the images, and reading the articles, nothing really prepares one for the incredible views not just from the air, but even from the ground.

We looped around flying turns about a point over key landmarks, awestruck by the natural beauty of the land, painstakingly etched over millions of years. With lots of help from Fred, I made my first landing at Sedona (SEZ). Taxing back, we took off again and this time climbed slowly to 10,500ft as we overflew Falgstaff airspace to make our way to the Flagstaff Snowbowl, a ski area very popular during the winter months. With spring here, the ski areas were deserted. But we could easily identify the ski slopes, the ski lifts and resort area.

In good time we retraced our path back to Flagstaff and all too soon the flight ended. If you are ever in the area, I highly recommend looking up Wiseman Aviation. If you have the time, you can do an aircraft checkout and rent an aircraft to fly. If not, take Fred.

Sedona does have a restaurant on the field: Mesa Grill. Although we did not stop on the day of the flight for a meal, we did have breakfast there. And I highly recommend staying at the Sky Ranch Lodge that is next to the airport and within walking distance to the Mesa Grill. While there, hike the airport loop for some spectacular views of the Sedona red canyons!

And that bucket list item, I think I will leave it on.

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Ah Bahamas!


February brings fond memories of Bahamas…

Has it really been 5 years?

If wishes were horses, I would, I should, I might, or I already would be in the Bahamas!

Five years ago today…


Last year when we planned the Bahamas trip, we set off with a hotel reservation in Fort Pierce, FL, which by the way, we had to change since we departed one day later than planned. Of course, we did need to prepare ahead of the time: radio licenses for the aircraft as well as the pilots, decal for the aircraft, and eAPIS accounts to submit passenger manifests. That was the extent of our planning. I roughly planned what stops we would make on the outbound, so we could have a rough estimate of flight times to expect and where we would stop for fuel, food and customs. But that was it.

Continue to read the full article here

See Also:

The Bahamas Adventure
Flying to the Bahamas in the C172