Asian-American and Pacific Islander Transportation History: Dr. Kalpana Chawla, Astronaut — Transportation History


Kalpana Chawla, an American astronaut who became the first woman of Indian descent to travel into space, was born in the city of Karnal in northern India in 1962. As a child, she demonstrated a strong enthusiasm for human flight by drawing pictures of airplanes. She also visited flying clubs in that region of India […]

via Asian-American and Pacific Islander Transportation History: Dr. Kalpana Chawla, Astronaut — Transportation History

Without Weather Reports, Flying Instruments, Radio, Or Parachutes These Aviators Flew Non-Stop Across the US in Just 27 Hours — Transportation History


May 3, 1923 The first non-stop transcontinental flight across the United States was completed when U.S. Army Air Service Lieutenants Oakley G. Kelly and John A. Macready landed their single-engine, high-wing Army Fokker T-2 plane at Rockwell Field near San Diego, California. This landing took place 26 hours, 50 minutes, and 48 seconds after they […]

via Without Weather Reports, Flying Instruments, Radio, Or Parachutes These Aviators Flew Non-Stop Across the US in Just 27 Hours — Transportation History

Women in Transportation History: Neta Snook Southern, Pilot — Transportation History


Aviation pioneer Neta Snook Southern was born in the city of Mount Carroll Illinois, in 1896. While best known for teaching Amelia Earhart how to fly, Southern also left behind a legacy of several other noteworthy aviation achievements. Southern graduated from Shimer School (now Shimer College) in Chicago in 1912. Three years later, she enrolled […]

via Women in Transportation History: Neta Snook Southern, Pilot — Transportation History

Women in Transportation History: Lorna de Blicquy, Pilot, Flight Instructor, Civil Aviation Inspector — Transportation History


Canadian aviation pioneer Lorna de Blicquy was born in 1931 near the town of Goderich in the province of Ontario. De Blicquy, who developed a strong interest in aviation after a cousin took her for a flight over the Canadian capital of Ottawa, started to take flying lessons when she was only 14. At the […]

via Women in Transportation History: Lorna de Blicquy, Pilot, Flight Instructor, Civil Aviation Inspector — Transportation History

Ah Bahamas!


February brings fond memories of Bahamas…

Has it really been 5 years?

If wishes were horses, I would, I should, I might, or I already would be in the Bahamas!

Five years ago today…


Last year when we planned the Bahamas trip, we set off with a hotel reservation in Fort Pierce, FL, which by the way, we had to change since we departed one day later than planned. Of course, we did need to prepare ahead of the time: radio licenses for the aircraft as well as the pilots, decal for the aircraft, and eAPIS accounts to submit passenger manifests. That was the extent of our planning. I roughly planned what stops we would make on the outbound, so we could have a rough estimate of flight times to expect and where we would stop for fuel, food and customs. But that was it.

Continue to read the full article here

See Also:

The Bahamas Adventure
Flying to the Bahamas in the C172

Pizzas Across The Border For Controllers by Russ Niles


In a show of solidarity with their unpaid U.S. counterparts, Canadian air traffic controllers ordered pizza for FAA controllers at facilities across the U.S. over the weekend. It started with controllers in Edmonton, Alberta buying pizza for the staff in Anchorage. The movement quickly spread and by Sunday, every Canadian ATC facility had been paired with one or more U.S. tower or center to supply some free meals for them. Many of the paired centers work closely with one another handing off aircraft between them but others, like Kelowna and Reno, are far removed from each other but shared the same sentiment as those in Vancouver. Vancouver controllers posted a photo of a sign urging staff to chip in $5 each for the gesture to thank U.S. controllers “for showing up to work and keeping things safe.”

Continue to read the article here.

The Day History Took Flight — Transportation History


December 17, 1903 It was the dawn of a new era. Orville and Wilbur Wright made transportation history near the North Carolina town of Kill Devil Hills (about four miles, or6.4 kilometers, south of the better-known town of Kitty Hawk) by bringing about the world’s first controlled, powered, and sustained heavier-than-air human flight. The brothers each […]

via The Day History Took Flight — Transportation History

He Didn’t Know How to Fly, But That Didn’t Stop Him — Transportation History


November 29, 1882 Aviation pioneer Henri Fabre was born in the French city of Marseille. Fabre’s advanced knowledge of science early on in life helped foster his powerful interest in human flight. With unmatched intensity, he studied and developed designs for planes and propellers. The result of Fabre’s efforts was his creation of the first […]

via He Didn’t Know How to Fly, But That Didn’t Stop Him — Transportation History

National Native American Heritage Month – Eula “Pearl” Carter Scott, Pilot — Transportation History


Eula “Pearl” Carter Scott made aviation history in1929 when she took off in a plane for a solo flight. Pearl, who was only 13 at the time, became the youngest pilot in the United States. She had been born in the city of Marlow in Oklahoma in 1915. Her mother was an enrolled member of […]

via National Native American Heritage Month – Eula “Pearl” Carter Scott, Pilot — Transportation History

Flying a plane: Its amazing effects on a person’s mind — Scott Beale Aviation


Ask any pilot out there and they’ll swear that flying a plane is the adventure of a lifetime. All those years learning and obtaining the requirements for flying are more than worth it. For commercial airline and business pilots, the pay is more than substantial. For pilots who’ve taken up flying as a hobby, the […]

via Flying a plane: Its amazing effects on a person’s mind — Scott Beale Aviation