Yes! Finals are over!


See you in 2018!

Instrument Approaches — Flying Summers Brothers


There is the old saw about getting your Private Pilot certificate, that it “is a ticket to learn,” meaning that you’ve just gotten the little slip of paper that lets you learn to be a better pilot. I totally buy that. I didn’t count on forgetting some of the things I learned, though. To get […]

via Instrument Approaches — Flying Summers Brothers

Time for Derby: Always Dreaming or Fast and Accurate?


Derby Day. Check-ride Anniversary. And most importantly the simply joy of flying!

May is always memorable. I got my Private Pilot Certificate. Three years later I got my Instrument rating.

“I hope we will be done by 3:00 pm, ” said Wanda, “I wan’t to watch the Kentucky Derby”

“I hope so too,” thought I. “With positive results.” For it was the day of my private pilot check-ride and I wanted to get home without a pink slip!

It was also Derby Day. And getting home to watch the race would be good too…

I did make it home in time to catch the race that day. That was 16 years ago!

As it happens, Derby day is tomorrow this year (5/6/2017).

Always Dreaming or Fast and Accurate?

Take your pick!

Finals are here… and all I can think of is my NY trip in April :-)


Flying the Hudson River Corridor Exclusion & Montauk Point!

“First will be xxxx aircraft, then John in xxxx will follow on and next will be…” continued Bob from our flight school, who had planned the whole flyout to the last minute detail.

I wondered how in the world we were going to keep the order straight leave alone spot the aircraft in front of us. Countless times ATC gives traffic warnings routinely. Only on a rare occasion am I ever able to spot the traffic. Often, I rely on ATC to tell me that I was clear of the traffic or to provide me deviations to avoid the traffic.

Maybe it will all work out, I thought.

Being in a C172 and in no hurry to exit the Hudson river corridor, I and my passengers opted to fly second last.

Bob in the Cougar was planning to fly last.
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America’s First Lady of the Air


Fly 'n Things

I was annoyed from the start by the attitude of doubt by the spectators that I would never really make the flight. This attitude made me more determined than ever to succeed.

— Harriet Quimby, just prior to her flight across the English Channel, 1912.

[Harriet Quimby, full-length portrait, standing, in aviation costume]

Photo Courtesy: Library of Congress

 Links:

Harriet Quimby

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An encounter with gliding


Five years ago…. although this happened many years before!

See Also:
Soaring on top of the World

Fly 'n Things

When Les asked me if I wanted to go flying that weekend, of course I jumped at the chance. Having never been in the air, I was excited and exhilarated at the prospect of being airborne. After all, wasn’t this my dream? To fly, to soar, and reach for the stars? Little did I think of thermals, lift and drag.

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How Air Traffic Control Works


Note: This was originally published on the Aviation Queen blog, where I have been fortunate enough to post as a guest contributor thanks to the immense kindness of Benét Wilson. While I love music, these days I find myself listening to air traffic control feeds more often than tunes. On average, more than 400,000 landings […]

via Invisible Highways: An Inside Look at Air Traffic Control in the U.S. — The Great Planes

Wills’s Aviation Card #50 – The First Lady Aviator. — Pioneers Of Aviation


History Behind The Card: The First Lady Aviator. Card #50 of 50, W.D.& H.O Wills, Aviation series 1910 Elise Raymonde Deroche, aka Raymonde de Laroche, August 22, 1882, in Paris, France – July 18, 1919 in Le Crotoy, France. What can we say about the short life of Elise Deroche who used her stage name when […]

via Wills’s Aviation Card #50 – The First Lady Aviator. — Pioneers Of Aviation

Katherine Stinson and the Early Age of Flight — Roger Launius’s Blog


Katherine Stinson (1891-1977) is not exactly a household name, but there was a time when she was the face of women in aviation in America. An early enthusiast of aviation, Katherine Stinson learned to fly from pioneering flyer Max Lillie at Cicero Field near Chicago, obtaining the fourth pilot’s license issued to a woman on Jul. […]

via Katherine Stinson and the Early Age of Flight — Roger Launius’s Blog