Time for Derby: Always Dreaming or Fast and Accurate?


Derby Day. Check-ride Anniversary. And most importantly the simply joy of flying!

May is always memorable. I got my Private Pilot Certificate. Three years later I got my Instrument rating.

“I hope we will be done by 3:00 pm, ” said Wanda, “I wan’t to watch the Kentucky Derby”

“I hope so too,” thought I. “With positive results.” For it was the day of my private pilot check-ride and I wanted to get home without a pink slip!

It was also Derby Day. And getting home to watch the race would be good too…

I did make it home in time to catch the race that day. That was 16 years ago!

As it happens, Derby day is tomorrow this year (5/6/2017).

Always Dreaming or Fast and Accurate?

Take your pick!

The Women Pilots History Forgot


Group of female aviators in front of the plane that completed the world tour, in 1934. At the time, women worldwide caught the transatlantic fever and wanted to follow Charles Lindbergh's footsteps.

(CNN)More than 100 years after Harriet Quimby broke down barriers as the first woman to earn a pilot certificate, there are still very few women who choose flying as a career.

Worldwide, only 3% of airline pilots are women, the Royal Aeronautical Society said earlier this month.
Now, there’s a move to change that.
And the obvious place to begin is by highlighting the achievements of the long-forgotten queens of the air — the women who ignored the men who scorned them, broke through the restrictions society placed on them, and paved the way for Amelia Earhart.

Continue to read the full article on here.

Remembering this day


dc2

In a way 9/11 triggered my childhood fascination for writing.

2001 was the year, I got my PPL. I could finally become a full member of the 99s. It was the year I took over as the editor of the Slipstream, the newsletter for my local chapter.

It was the year, I started my blog. Sadly enough the first ever article I ever posted was an editorial in the Slipstream entitled: We will never forget.

Here is a link to what I posted on my blog last year: We will always remember.

And the link to an article  I posted on the tenth anniversary: This day, Ten Years Ago.

It is a great country we live in. In memory of that day, and all the freedoms we have fought to retain, I flew this morning down the Potomac river for a practice flight and on a good note I have my sign off finally for my commercial check ride!

Sri


NaNoWriMore

“Sri Rama Chandra Murthy!” yelled Chung.

The voice reverberated across the floor. Each of us, stopped what we were doing, while we waited for the echo to end and peered around to see what the ruckus was about. A yell from Chung of this magnitude meant only one thing: not good.

“Keep your shirt on, Chung. I am right here,” Sri responded, with a hint of laughter in his voice, after what seemed an eternity, getting up from one of the desks in the corner.

Chung eyed him squarely, as if he could devour him with his gaze. “And what took you so long to respond?” he queried sternly. “I thought you might like a moment to chill out,” smiled Sri, nonchalantly and easily, as he headed over to the front desk.

“Hey dude, you know I thought you handled Bert with aplomb. I knew I could count on you. Hearing you giving him the run through on the club rules and how you would make mince-meat of him if he even had a single straying thought in that direction was superb. You know I always admire the way you handle things around here with the precision of the military general. You know you never finished telling me the story about how you…”, the voices faded as Sri, yet again smoothly and suavely, averted another showdown with Chung and had him distracted enough, to be eating out his hands. I could soon hear laughter as yet again Chung reminisced about his war days recounting another of his escapades, the issue with Bert long forgotten.

Sri was an easy going chap, always smiling, cheerful and well-loved equally by instructors and students alike. He had a sharp mind, a computer engineer by profession, and a flight instructor by choice. He had shown up at the flight school a couple of years ago wanting to get flying lessons. He had swarmed through the professional program that Dessert Air offered from private pilot to certified flight instructor within a year and was now a part time CFI. Most weekends he could be seen hanging out in the lounge when not teaching, having long debates with anyone who was around about any topic in the world. He was a geek at heart.

Truth be told, I had a fondness for Sri. He was my first student at Dessert Air.

One fine summer morning, he had shown up at the flight school asking about classes. Things were slow. Not too many students to feed all the out of work CFI. I hung around the lounge, anxious to get in the air even if in a two seater. Being in the air felt normal. Sitting around twiddling my thumbs waiting for someone or something was not my thing.

On one of those bright summer mornings, Sri had shown up promptly at 9:00 am on a Saturday morning. I could hear the excitement in his voice as he queried the front desk personnel, “I want to learn to fly. What do I need to get started?”

It was one of those lucky days for me. I was glad I had woken up early and showed up at 9:00am. Sri was an exemplary student. He was a quick learner and at times spoke incessantly. I could hear the concern in his voice as he expressed doubts and the assertiveness as he argued a point. He had a plethora of random bits of knowledge and it was impossible to outsmart any debate with him. He almost always had the last word.

At the end of that first discovery flight, he admitted to having an aunt who was pilot and having flown with her over the glorious San Francisco Bay as a 17 year old. The joy and incredible enthusiasm in his voice as he recounted those memories and how they sparked his excitement and eagerness spoke volumes about his passion for flying. How could I doubt a teenager’s eagerness to be a pilot?

I had been in his shoes, not so long ago. In a way, Sri was my savior. On a day, when my world was crumbling, he was the anchor that steered me in.

And so began my second career as a CFI.

I touched Spaceship One!!!


Monday’s Inspiration

Celebrating SpaceShipOne this week to mark the historic first flight in 2004.

In the fall of 2003, I had the pleasure of coming face to face with SpaceShipOne in the hanger of Scaled Composites offices at Mojave Airport….

Fly 'n Things

This past weekend I had the opportunity to visit Lancaster, CA for the Ninety Nines Southwest Section Fall Meeting.  It was an incredible trip lasting three days and I am still floating in the clouds….

Day one started with a trip to NASA Dryden and Edwards AFB. First half of the morning was spent at NASA viewing the latest research vehicles such as the  IFCS (Intelligent Flight Control Systems), a heavily modified McDonnel Douglas NF-15B fitted with neural network control systems. We also got to see and climb partway, the Shuttle MDD (Mate/Demate Device) Facility.  This is where the shuttle is brought after a landing at Edwards AFB, to be mated to the NASA 747 carrier to be transported back to Florida.

Following lunch on the base, where we had a delightful meal with the guest of honor, the Deputy head of NASA Dryden, we drove out to Edwards AFB…

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We Will Always Remember


9/11: Thirteen years later…

We’ve come a long way since that horrific day, thirteen years ago. Time has only proved how resilient we are.

Today is a day to reflect on all that we have lost, remember all those that sacrificed their lives and be thankful for the fortitude we have garnered over the years and the triumph we have achieved to not let the enemy overtake us.

Today is a day to remember and reflect.

See Also:

This Day, Ten Years Ago

We Will Never Forget