Electric planes are beginning to take to the sky — Scott Beale Aviation


In a recent report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), it was stated that aircraft have been responsible for about 8% of the entire greenhouse gas emission of the country’s transportation sector. This alarming development, coupled by a global demand for a greener aviation, is a huge reason why some manufacturers are beginning to […]

via Electric planes are beginning to take to the sky — Scott Beale Aviation

His Aviation Legacy Is So Much More Than the Helicopter — Transportation History


March 5, 1923 Aviation pioneer Igor Sikorsky established the Sikorsky Aero Engineering Corporation on Long Island, thereby opening a new and significant chapter in aircraft development. Igor Sikorsky immigrated to the United States from his native Russia in 1919 with comparatively little money and no job, but a strong interest and ability when it came […]

via His Aviation Legacy Is So Much More Than the Helicopter — Transportation History

Ah Bahamas!


February brings fond memories of Bahamas…

Has it really been 5 years?

If wishes were horses, I would, I should, I might, or I already would be in the Bahamas!

Five years ago today…


Last year when we planned the Bahamas trip, we set off with a hotel reservation in Fort Pierce, FL, which by the way, we had to change since we departed one day later than planned. Of course, we did need to prepare ahead of the time: radio licenses for the aircraft as well as the pilots, decal for the aircraft, and eAPIS accounts to submit passenger manifests. That was the extent of our planning. I roughly planned what stops we would make on the outbound, so we could have a rough estimate of flight times to expect and where we would stop for fuel, food and customs. But that was it.

Continue to read the full article here

See Also:

The Bahamas Adventure
Flying to the Bahamas in the C172

Pizzas Across The Border For Controllers by Russ Niles


In a show of solidarity with their unpaid U.S. counterparts, Canadian air traffic controllers ordered pizza for FAA controllers at facilities across the U.S. over the weekend. It started with controllers in Edmonton, Alberta buying pizza for the staff in Anchorage. The movement quickly spread and by Sunday, every Canadian ATC facility had been paired with one or more U.S. tower or center to supply some free meals for them. Many of the paired centers work closely with one another handing off aircraft between them but others, like Kelowna and Reno, are far removed from each other but shared the same sentiment as those in Vancouver. Vancouver controllers posted a photo of a sign urging staff to chip in $5 each for the gesture to thank U.S. controllers “for showing up to work and keeping things safe.”

Continue to read the article here.