Monday Morning Inspiration: First American Woman in Space

Sally Ride

Sally Ride's official astronaut portrait

Photo Courtesy: NASA

Sally Ride was born on May 26th, 1951 in Encino, CA. Older of two daughters, her interest in science grew at an early age. She went on to get a bachelor of science in Physics, a bachelor of arts in English, a master of science and a PhD in physics from Stanford University.

When NASA was looking for woman astronaut candidates in 1977, Sally Ride was one of the six women selected. She became the first American woman in space when she flew aboard Space Shuttle Challenger on June 18th, 1983.

She made two shuttle flights, and later became a champion for science education and a role model for generations. She wrote five science related children’s books and co-founded, Sally Ride Science, to encourage children, especially girls, to study science.

She died of cancer in 2012.

March is Women History Month & Women of Aviation Month.

See Also:

Sally Ride: First American Woman in Space

First female combat pilot and mother of the air ambulance: The remarkable story of Marie Marvingt — Hush-Kit

Amelia Earhart was all very well, but did she cycle the Tour de France? Amy Johnson was pretty good but did she swim the length of the Seine? Jackie Cochran achieved a lot but was she the champion precision shooter of all France? No. And how many people fly in a supersonic Voodoo jet on their 80th birthday? The remarkable…

via First female combat pilot and mother of the air ambulance: The remarkable story of Marie Marvingt — Hush-Kit

Monday Morning Inspiration: Suzanne Asbury-Oliver

Love in the Clouds

Photo Courtesy: Smithsonian

Suzanne Asbury-Oliver is the only professional female skywriter in the world. She started flying gliders when she was only 14,  soloing at 15 and by the time she was 18, she was a Certified Flight Instructor.

She has been skywriting the skies of United States and Canada for Pepsi Cola Company since 1980. In fact, she met her husband Steve Oliver at the Kentucky Derby while she was skywriting for Pepsi and he was banner towing advertisements in his 1941 Stearman. She and her husband own their own plane and skywriting business called Olivers Flying Circus.

March is Women History Month and Women of Aviation Month.

See Also:

Smithsonian Women in Aviation & Space
Olivers Flying Circus


Happy International Women’s Day

Avani Chaturvedi


There was a news item earlier this week that Indian Women Pilots have surpassed the global average. I had written a brief article last year about how, even though there is no General Aviation activity, the proportion of women pilots in India was higher than other countries.

This past week, Avani Chaturvedi became the first Indian Women to fly a fighter jet solo, a MIG -21 Bison for 30 minutes. What is remarkable is, she is 24 years old and is one of the three women inducted into the Indian Air Force. The other two women are Bavana Kanth and Mohana Singh.

See Also:

Indian Women Pilots
First Indian Women to Fly a Fighter Jet
Indian Women Soar past the Global Average


Today in Women’s Transportation History – 1931: An Aviation Legend is Born — Transportation History

Geraldyn “Jerrie” M. Cobb, a well-established female trailblazer of the skies, was born in Norman, Oklahoma. Her father was a pilot and, with his encouragement, she developed a strong interest in aviation at an early age. By the time she was 12, Cobb was learning how to fly in her father’s 1936 Waco Aircraft Company […]

via Today in Women’s Transportation History – 1931: An Aviation Legend is Born — Transportation History

Monday Morning Inspiration: Blanche Stuart Scott

First Women to Fly

Blanche Scott was the first women to drive across the United States and the first women to fly.

Born in 1889, Blanche Scott’s life spanned from the era of airplane invention, to seeing the first man walk on the moon. In an age when women couldn’t vote and their place was considered to be at home, she became the first woman to drive across the US. There were only 218 miles of roads outside the cities.

Photo courtesy Wikepedia: Blanche Stuart Scott seated at the controls of a Curtiss Model D, circa early 1910s.

Some aviation firsts:

  • She became the first women to take a shot solo hop in the air, when an aircraft she was taxing lifted off the ground.
  • She was the first and only women to receive flight instruction from Glenn Curtiss.
  • She made her first public flight  in October 1910.
  • She set the women’s long distance record for flight of 10 miles and later 25 miles in 1911
  • She became the first women test pilot in America,  the first woman stunt pilot or The Tomboy of the Air
  • She played the lead role in The Aviator’s Bride, the first movie about flying
  • She was also the first women passenger to ride in a passenger jet

March is Women History Month, and Women of Aviation Month.

See Also:

National Women’s Hall of Fame
Smithsonian – Women in Aviation and Space History
Early Aviators

Today in African-American Transportation History – February 22 — Transportation History

Today in African-American Transportation History – 1997: A Trailblazer Retires from the U.S. Air Force African-American aviation pioneer and U.S. Air Force (USAF) Major General Marcelite Jordan Harris retired after more than three decades of service in the nation’s military aerial service branch. Harris, who was born in Texas in 1943, initially sought to pursue […]

via Today in African-American Transportation History – February 22 — Transportation History

2017: The Year That Was

A Year of Women!

This has been a strange year… but definitely A Year of Women!

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Here are some highlights from flynthings from 2017…

Bao Bao
Finding a Voice Amidst the Threats & Fears
Cherry Blossoms
Montauk Point
Cape May
Climate Change: It’s Serious
Save Tangier
Daytona Sunrises
Rise Up & Speak Up or #TakeAKnee
Letter of the Century
Come From Away
A Door in the Sky

Top 3 most viewed posts in 2017:

Flying to the Bahamas in a C172 continued to dominate for the 5th straight year.
Followed by GA Flying over Niagara Falls,  and
 Indian Women Pilots came a distant third.

Here’s hoping 2018 will be far better…

National Hispanic Heritage Month: Aida de Acosta — Transportation History

Aviation trailblazer Aida de Acosta (1881-1962) was born in Long Beach, New Jersey. She was the daughter of Ricardo de Acosta, a steamship company executive of Cuban descent. In June 1903 Acosta became the first woman to fly a motorized aircraft on her own. While she was visiting Paris, renowned Brazilian aviator Alberto Santos-Dumont taught […]

via National Hispanic Heritage Month: Aida de Acosta — Transportation History